David Godman explains his memories about Nisargadatta Maharaj


Harriet: Ramesh Balsekar used to say, ‘The only effective effort is the immediate apperception of reality’. Some people would take that to mean that if you don’t get the direct experience as the Guru, in this case Maharaj, is talking to you, you are not going to get it at all. Are you sure you are not just suffering from a case of wishful thinking?

David: There is something in what you say. If you could keep your intellect out of the way when Maharaj was speaking, his words, and the authority behind them, would do their work. When he spoke he wasn’t asking you to join in the process at all. How could he be asking you to do anything when he knew that you didn’t exist? He wasn’t asking you to understand, and he wasn’t saying, ‘Do this and you will be enlightened’. He wasn’t addressing you at all. He was directing his words at the consciousness within you in an attempt to make you aware of who you really were. However, if his words didn’t immediately produce results, he knew that they might deliver the goods later on. Remember what happened in his own case. Siddharameshwar told him that he was Brahman. Nisargadatta struggled with this for three years until he finally dropped his doubts and realised it to be the truth.

There is a power in a jnani’s words and that power does not dissipate two seconds after the jnani has uttered them. It lingers and it carries on being effective; it carries on doing its work.

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